Sociology/Anthropology/Social Science program

anthropology-sociology-social science

Coordinator: Steve Johnson
925-969-2430
SJohnson@dvc.edu
  FO-149
Division: Social Science
  925-969-2452
Directory: Anthropology/Sociology/Social Science faculty and staff

Possible career opportunities in anthropology
Anthropology is a basic component for careers like anthropologist, anthropology instructor, museum curator, population analyst, urban planner, social services consultation, and environmental impact analyst. Most career options require more than two years of college study.

Possible career opportunities in social science
Social science fields are many and varied, as are the associated career opportunities. Careers with all levels of government, research and teaching are all possibilities. Most career options require more than two years of college study.

Possible career opportunities in sociology
Sociology provides students with career opportunities including criminologist, employment counselor, interviewer, researcher, social worker, and urban planner. Most career options require more than two years of college study.

 

Associate degree and certificate program information

Degrees and certificates offered by the Anthropology/Sociology/Social Science area:

Associate in arts for transfer degrees

  • Anthropology (ANTHR)
  • Sociology (SOCIO)

 

Anthropology/sociology/social science class schedules

 

Return to Social Science Department page

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Sociology provides students with the ability to see their lives--and the lives of others--as part of the vast sea of cultures and connections that we call society. With this sociological imagination, students are empowered to make more informed personal decisions and to figure out how to participate in efforts to improve society for others. In a multi-ethnic and global world, sociology is fundamentally useful for anyone who wants to be an informed citizen. Sociology provides students with career opportunities including teaching sociology at the college level, working as a research scientist working in academic jobs or for government agencies, non-profit organizations or the private sector. Sociology is valuable for all careers that involve working with people, including social work, nursing, K-12 teaching, community organizing, urban planning, criminology, employment counseling, and many other fields. Most career options require more than two years of college study.

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